The Hootie 2.0

Working with Neto Construction in Sterling, VA on the next model of our indoor aquaponic system, the Hootie 2.0.

It has a 55-gallon fishtank on wheels for roll-out easy access. (See Hootie 1.0)

Here we see Danny Neto cutting some Ultra-Skrim FGC liner, a great product from Global Plastic Sheeting. It’s handy for aquaponics because  it’s:

1) very puncture/tear resistant;
2) pliable;
3) food grade; and
4) only 13 microns thick, whoa baby!!!

Super Informative Doc on Hydroponic Components

Check out the report here:
This recent release details the hydroponic components of an aquaponic system. Recommended reading for any aquaponic newbie or even mid-leveler.
From D. Allen Pattillo at Iowa State University. Thanks Dr. P!
 

Installing the Filtration Skid @ PR Harris

Here we see Bill installing the “Filtration Skid” @ PR Harris Community College in Southeast Washington, DC.

This pic is from last Fall. Hey, gotta blog sumthin’…

The Filtration Skid is akin to the organs and nervous system of an advanced aquaponic system. On the Filtration Skid are a drum filter, bag filter, bio-filter, UV sterilization lights, oxygenation devices, and various pumps and sensors.

Brewing Vermicompost Tea at the Aquaponics Meetup

Here are Julie, Hala, and Cheryl getting ready to brew some vermicompost tea at our aquaponics meetup last night. Cheryl looks to be digging under a bed of newspaper to find our squiggly friends below.

About 10 or 15 local aquaponics enthusiasts came by to participate last night. We tested the system water for pH, ammonia, and nitrates and discussed the results; we chatted about fish feeding ratios; we brewed vermicompost tea and discussed applications for aquaponic systems; and we added worms to the media bed.

Thanks everybody who came out to visit and share your knowledge. We’ll be posting more practical info about vermicompost tea applications in aquaponics, stay tuned!

Checkout Scott’s Backyard System in NE DC!

scotts system

Scott has been running this system in his backyard in NE DC for over two years. Below is the fishtank, a submerged IBC Tote with cover. Scott estimates he has about 10 Bullhead Catfish and over 50 Blue Gill, some of which have been here almost three years! He and his family have eaten about 15 of their own fish grown in their own DC backyard… Gnarly! (He says the Blue Gill are much tastier.)

Up top is the grow bed. Scott estimates that during the warmer months it produces about a salad a day for his family. Wow, great numbers. And he uses rainwater from his roof, very environmentally friendly! (and lower pH)

As pictured, the system is operating under the tarp for winter. It expands out during the rest of the year, and Scott is continually adding growbeds.

Here’s a link to his forum thread in case you are interested in more info: Scott’s aquaponic forum thread.

 

So What’s the Deal With Chlorine?

Chlorine-001

In this pic, we see a comparison of the chlorine level between DC tap water and from an aquaponic system with the same source water. Five months ago this 30-gallon aquaponic system was treated with a small bottlecap-full of a solution to remove chloramine (“total chlorine”). Despite frequent top-offs from the same tap, there is still no chloramine detected in the aquaponic system, whereas the tapwater has 3ppm.

Municipalities add chlorine and sometimes chloramine to disinfect public drinking water. The DC Water website states: “The drinking water delivered by DC Water contains chloramines.”

Chlorine (“free chlorine”) will off-gas and dissipate naturally. But chloramine (“total chlorine”) needs to be actively removed.

Unfortunately, the same chlorine and chloramine that keeps our drinking water safe can kill our aquaponic “biofilter”: the large bacterial colony that converts fish waste into plantfood. So check with your municipality and address your chloramines if necessary so you dont kill your bacteria and your fish don’t choke on their own toxic ammonia. 🙂

Jimbo’s Backyard System in Northern Virginia

Jimbo's System

Check out Jimbo’s backyard aquaponic system in Northern Virginia.

Jimbo is pushing the limits of personal food production — his system can grow about six-hundred heads of lettuce at a time in his own backyard! He uses a 300 gallon IBC Tote as his fish tank, and two 20 x 4 grow troughs for his plants.

Our country relies on a wasteful and inefficient food system that contributes to pollution, resource depletion, income inequality, and poor health. Jimbo shows how we can use aquaponics and permaculture methods to produce more of our own food on our own terms!

Visit the Tomahawk Permaculture website for more info.

 

 

Home for the Winter

Home for the Winter

Here is Niraj, Founder and Director of Cultivate the City, in one of his new rooftop greenhouses near H Street in Northeast DC.

And, in the bucket to the back left is the winter home of our goldfish from the JO Wilson aquaponic system. The fish will be fertilizing this vertical tower of strawberries. We even brought over some of the “bio-balls” from the JO Wilson biofilter to ensure an adequate bacterial colony to convert the fish waste into plant food.

Room for Improvement…

Room For Improvement...

Here are some decent roots on our young aquaponic kale at J.O. Wilson Elementary School, but roots ain’t gonna pay no bills! (unless they are root vegetables.)

Unfortunately we got this system, “The Cardinal”, started late in the year. We only added about 10 goldfish to start and we weren’t able to pump out any significant veggie volume. (But we did conduct numerous science lessons with students.)

We shut The Cardinal down for the Winter to protect it from the weather. (The goldfish are staying warm with Cultivate the City in a mini aquaponic system growing strawberries in a rooftop greenhouse.)

2017 will be about maximizing the production of high-quality crops, quantifying our production, and standardizing operating procedures.