DC Food Recovery Week Events

October 21 – 28 is Food Recovery Week in Washington, DC. Check out a full list of events at dcfoodrecovery.org.

Anacostia Aquaponics is hosting two events in conjunction.

Backyard Aquaponic Fish Harvest, Clean & Cook
October 26, 5:30 – 7:30pm

Worms and Coffee
October 28, 9:00 – 11:30am

OK, vermicomposting makes sense, but what does a fish harvest have to do with food waste & recovery?

In honor of DC food recovery week we are going to bokashi compost the fish guts. The fish guts and skeletons are extremely rich with nutrients that plants need. There is no reason to send these nutrients hundreds of miles to a landfill to rot. Instead, we can use compost methods to transform and re-use these nutrients right here in our own city. (and on a large scale this will create many JOBS).

Aquaponics can also stem the problem of food waste by providing vegetables to urban and arid areas without crop spoilage during transport.

Our nation wastes thousands of tons of vegetables each year due to spoilage during transport. Contrast this with Scott’s aquaponic system where we’re hosting this event. In the warm months Scott grows an entire salad a day for his entire family that can be harvested the same day they eat it; if we all grew hyper-local like Scott there would be a LOT LESS FOOD WASTE!

Large Commercial Aquaponics Project Planned in Sterling, VA

“Urban farming company Kappa Farms will invest $865,000 and hire 21 people to open an aquaponics operation in Sterling.” (VA)

“According to the office of Governor Terry McAuliffe, the company will build a closed-loop nutrient cycle aquaponics facility which will produce certified organic baby lettuces and arugula using water and nutrients derived from fish waste. The company will produce more than $7 million worth Virginia-grown lettuces over the next three years, which it will then sell to customers and restaurants in the Washington, DC, metro area.”

Full article on Loudonnow.com: Kappa Farms to open Loudon Aquaponics Facility —

Urban Ag Policy-Making

Here’s a meeting of the Urban Ag working group of the DC Food Policy Council.

On the agenda:

  • Getting the DC Comprehensive Plan to incorporate Urban Ag
  • Coordinating DC growers and regulators to implement the DC Cottage Food Act

The DC government must ensure that sustainable practices like aquaponics, hydroponics, vertical growing, rooftop growing, and composting are properly incentivized to account for their positive externalies, obviously.

The Soil Food Web in Aquaponics

AQP Association Fact Sheet – The Soil Food Web

This document explains how aquaponic systems utilize the Soil Food Web to produce healthy crops – despite the lack of soil.

Our food system is rapidly changing due to the convergence of pressing global issues including climate change; environmental degradation; water depletion; economic insecurity; health problems due to poor diets and pollution; and rapid population growth and urbanization.

As we shape our new food system, one critical consideration is whether we retain access to high quality fresh fruits and vegetables, particularly those grown sustainably.

This document shows that aquaponics can deliver fresh fruits and vegetables grown from seed, with the same symbiotic biological processes used by plants since the dawn of time. Check it out!

http://aquaponicsassociation.org/s/AQP-Association-Fact-Sheet-The-Soil-Food-Web.pdf

Quantifying and Monetizing the Benefits of Aquaponics

Quantifying and Monetizing the Benefits of Aquaponics

You see, in our economic system we don’t account for the hidden costs of food production. Aquaponic producers have difficulty monetizing their benefits because industrial agriculture producers have an implicit subsidy to use as much water, carbon, pesticides, fertilizers, and antibiotics they want! Even a conservative economist should support public actions to force producers to internalize these costs of production so that others don’t have to pay later.

Click the link below to check out a PDF presentation by Anacostia Aquaponics Director Brian Filipowich on this topic. It was given at the Aquaponics Association conference in Austin, TX this past November.

Quantifying and Monetizing the Benefits of Aquaponics

The Washington Post Boosts Tilapia!

The Washington Post recently ran an article of interest to the aquaponic community: Tilapia Has a Terrible Reputation. Does it Deserve It? (Tamar Haspel. Washington Post. October 24, 2016.)

The Post found that tilapia has an unfair bad rap, and this should make us aquaponic folk angry! Because its costing us!

The article states: “Tilapia, in short, is an environmentally friendly, lean, low-calorie source of protein. We need all of those we can get.” And they did a taste test among some top Washington, DC food gurus; tilapia ranked 2nd of 6 among similar types of fish.

The commercial performance of tilapia is important to the success of the aquaponic industry. Tilapia is the most commonly used aquaponic fish because of its ability to withstand wide variances of ph, temperature, and water quality. And cuz its a quick efficient grower. In a 2015 survey, Commercial Aquaponics Production and Profitability, Findings from an International Survey (Love et al, 2015), researchers found that 69% of respondents used tilapia.

While tilapia is not as healthy or delicious as salmon, it is a lean source of healthy protein. Aquaponics offers us a way to grow this lean healthy protein locally, even in urban areas. This could have dramatically positive repercussions for our health, environment, and economy. But, perversely, these fish are more of an economic liability than an asset for most aquaponic operations, as found in a 2015 paper: Economics of Aquaponics (Engle, 2015).

Right now, tilapia is undervalued because of consumers’ misconceptions (which stem from poor-quality chinese tilapia imports). We need to show consumers that tilapia – when raised appropriately – is healthy and tasty. Then the price of tilapia will rise like the water in your media bed!

For some aquaponic operations, an increase in the price of tilapia will have a significant effect on their bottom line.

(And this does not even go into the fact that we don’t adequately charge for the costs of our food system to our environment and health. Is it REALLY cheaper to buy a tilapia raised in unhealthy conditions shipped from thousands of miles away in China?????!?!?!? We need to start building the hidden costs of our food system into our food prices. These costs include extreme water usage, carbon usage, pesticide usage, antibiotic usage, fertilizer usage, and nutrient runoff. Then the price of long-distance industrially-produced food would go up and we would be incentivized to buy local food… which would also benefit our economy!)

And see another good industry survey: An International Survey of Aquaponics Practitioners (Love et al, 2014)