NOSB Gives Organic Aquaponics the GREEN Light!

From the Aquaponics Association-
The National Organic Standards Board (NOSB) voted 8 to 7 last week to reject proposals that would have banned aquaponics and hydroponics from organic eligibility. The Board did vote to ban aeroponics.

The Aquaponics Association applauds the NOSB’s decision. Aquaponics embodies exactly what consumers expect in their organic produce:

  1. No synthetic pesticides or chemicals;
  2. Resource-efficient and planet-friendly; and
  3. A thriving, diverse microbial root ecosystem.

The NOSB’s decision will usher in a host of benefits to our food system. Aquaponics gives us the ability to eat fresh, local produce even in dense urban areas and arid climates. The organic label will allow commercial aquaponic growers to supply retailers the most local organic food possible.

Aquaponics employs closed-loop, recirculating systems of fish and plants. These systems use over 90% less water than soil farming; do not emit harmful agriculture discharge; and use the minimum resources necessary to grow vibrant, healthy crops.

For consumers, the NOSB’s decision will lead to more accessible, affordable produce as more aquaponic growers enter the organic market. Aquaponics will also foster local economic growth with year-round food production jobs that can never be outsourced.

In short, the NOSB’s decision is a big WIN for our environment, our health, and our economy.

DC Food Recovery Week Events

October 21 – 28 is Food Recovery Week in Washington, DC. Check out a full list of events at dcfoodrecovery.org.

Anacostia Aquaponics is hosting two events in conjunction.

Backyard Aquaponic Fish Harvest, Clean & Cook
October 26, 5:30 – 7:30pm

Worms and Coffee
October 28, 9:00 – 11:30am

OK, vermicomposting makes sense, but what does a fish harvest have to do with food waste & recovery?

In honor of DC food recovery week we are going to bokashi compost the fish guts. The fish guts and skeletons are extremely rich with nutrients that plants need. There is no reason to send these nutrients hundreds of miles to a landfill to rot. Instead, we can use compost methods to transform and re-use these nutrients right here in our own city. (and on a large scale this will create many JOBS).

Aquaponics can also stem the problem of food waste by providing vegetables to urban and arid areas without crop spoilage during transport.

Our nation wastes thousands of tons of vegetables each year due to spoilage during transport. Contrast this with Scott’s aquaponic system where we’re hosting this event. In the warm months Scott grows an entire salad a day for his entire family that can be harvested the same day they eat it; if we all grew hyper-local like Scott there would be a LOT LESS FOOD WASTE!

Large Commercial Aquaponics Project Planned in Sterling, VA

“Urban farming company Kappa Farms will invest $865,000 and hire 21 people to open an aquaponics operation in Sterling.” (VA)

“According to the office of Governor Terry McAuliffe, the company will build a closed-loop nutrient cycle aquaponics facility which will produce certified organic baby lettuces and arugula using water and nutrients derived from fish waste. The company will produce more than $7 million worth Virginia-grown lettuces over the next three years, which it will then sell to customers and restaurants in the Washington, DC, metro area.”

Full article on Loudonnow.com: Kappa Farms to open Loudon Aquaponics Facility —

Urban Ag Policy-Making

Here’s a meeting of the Urban Ag working group of the DC Food Policy Council.

On the agenda:

  • Getting the DC Comprehensive Plan to incorporate Urban Ag
  • Coordinating DC growers and regulators to implement the DC Cottage Food Act

The DC government must ensure that sustainable practices like aquaponics, hydroponics, vertical growing, rooftop growing, and composting are properly incentivized to account for their positive externalies, obviously.

The Soil Food Web in Aquaponics

AQP Association Fact Sheet – The Soil Food Web

This document explains how aquaponic systems utilize the Soil Food Web to produce healthy crops – despite the lack of soil.

Our food system is rapidly changing due to the convergence of pressing global issues including climate change; environmental degradation; water depletion; economic insecurity; health problems due to poor diets and pollution; and rapid population growth and urbanization.

As we shape our new food system, one critical consideration is whether we retain access to high quality fresh fruits and vegetables, particularly those grown sustainably.

This document shows that aquaponics can deliver fresh fruits and vegetables grown from seed, with the same symbiotic biological processes used by plants since the dawn of time. Check it out!

http://aquaponicsassociation.org/s/AQP-Association-Fact-Sheet-The-Soil-Food-Web.pdf