What is a “Food System”?

This is good definition of the “food system”, adapted from the Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Food. (sounds fancy). Basically the food system is everything you can possibly think of that has to do with putting food on your plate. The food system is:

  • all those activities involving the production, processing, transport, consumption, and cleanup of food;
  • the governance and economics of food production, its sustainability, the degree to which we waste food, and how food production affects the natural environment;
  • how food affects health and well-being, including nutrition, obesity and food safety;
  • food access, quality, and education in areas with poverty; and
  • the history, cultural, and social aspect of food.

Why is this important? Stay tuned……..

 

Priming the pump

Agriculture is a major user of ground and surface water in the United States, accounting for approximately 80 percent of the Nation’s consumptive water use and over 90 percent in many Western States. (USDA)

Aquaponics uses less than 10% of water compared to conventional agriculture, depending on the climatic conditions. Aquaponics can grow in locations with drought, poor soil quality, or challenging climates. (Goddek et al, 2015)

Aquaponics is most appropriate where land is expensive, water is scarce, and soil is poor. Deserts and arid areas, sandy islands and urban gardens are the locations most appropriate for aquaponics because it uses an absolute minimum of water. There is no need for soil, and aquaponics avoids the issues associated with soil compaction, salinization, pollution, disease and tiredness. Similarly, aquaponics can be used in urban and peri-urban environments where no or very little land is available, providing a means to grow dense crops on small balconies, patios, indoors or on rooftops. (Somerville et al, 2014)